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Abu Dhabi waste hub stepping up to reach UAE’s 75% recycling goal

Around 420 000 end-of-life tyres were recycled in Abu Dhabi over the first eight months of 2018, according to new figures released by Tadweer Waste Management Centre.

Upwards of 7000 tonnes of discarded car tyres were shredded and purified to create crumb rubber in Abu Dhabi last year. The recycling hub in the United Arab Emirates mainly used the material to create sustainable flooring for sports grounds and children’s playgrounds.

Apart from creating high-end products, the centre is also reducing the impact of the UAE’s rampant tyre dumping trend. Salem Al Kaabi, general manager at the Tadweer site comments: ‘The facility ensures the safe disposal of used and damaged tyres in the emirates. It eliminates the need for worse methods such as burning or landfilling that have severe environmental and public health consequences.’ And he adds: ‘Also, the factory saves millions of dirhams in raw material costs.’

Kaabi notes that Tadweer will do what it can to help recycle 75% of waste produced in the United Arab Emirates by 2021. The capital has set up several other dedicated recycling plants to meet this ambitious goal. These include an engine oil recycling facility as well as a construction and demolition recycling centre.

Scaling up tyre recycling operations seems like a wise move. The global automotive tyre market was already worth US$ 233 billion in 2017. 
The sector is expected to grow 3.8% over the next couple of years to account for US$ 306.44 billion in 2025, so report analysts at Research & Markets.

Recently, the Abu Dhabi Fund for Development granted a US$ 33 million loan to establish a waste-to-energy plant said to be capable of processing more than 300 000 tonnes of municipal solid waste per year. This state-of-the-art facility is expected to generate around 30 MW of energy annually.

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