Skip to main content

Sims oves nearer 40 kg ELV target

USA – Sims Metal Management, the world’s largest metal recycler, says it is now able to recycle a further 23 kg of material from the End of Life Vehicles (ELVs) it receives, enabling the company to provide its suppliers with credits towards ELV compliance targets.

The increased volume of material recovered from an average vehicle is the result of significant investment by the company in post-shredder technologies, enabling it to recover greater quantities of metals, plastics and other materials. Using government-approved protocols, a basic 81% of material can already be assumed to be recovered from a vehicle, so the extra recovery will allow authorised treatment facilities (ATFs) to move a step closer to the 85% target, and some beyond this level, Sims claims.
Development of more advanced separation techniques – Sims’ automotive shredder residue separation plants are now in their third generation – leaves Simon Palmer, Group Business Development Manager, confident about the future.
‘We are pleased to be able to provide this 23 kg credit to our suppliers, but that is just the start. Innovative separation technologies on the latest plant are demonstrating ever greater recovery rates; commissioning is almost complete and we anticipate being able to achieve recovery rates in the region of 40 kg per ELV,’ he said.
Reaching the 40 kg milestone should enable ATFs that supply Sims, and are only currently achieving the basic 81% protocol figure, to demonstrate full compliance
 

Would you like to share any interesting developments or article ideas with us? Don't hesitate to contact us.

You might find this interesting too

All change after healthy 2021
Steep fall in Turkish steel scrap imports, India seeing ‘exponential growth’ 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Subscribe now and get a full year for just €169 (normal rate is €225) Subscribe