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UK flat panel recycling initiative

United Kingdom – Electronics recycling firm Recycling Lives is claimed to be the first company in the UK to have developed a dedicated flat panel display (FPD) processing centre.

Based at Preston in north-west England, the company’s plant accepts large quantities of FPD units such as flat screen televisions and computer monitors. The disassembly process is broken down into stages in order to increase the speed of unit handling. At full capacity, Recycling Lives claims to be able to recycle up to 1000 units per day, which means that the firm can take on both small and large-scale FPD recycling contracts.


 


When broken during manual disassembly, the lighting tubes behind FPD screens release toxic mercury vapours that are harmful to the environment and to the staff who are processing them. ‘Our state-of-the-art FPD installation has been developed under the guidance of industry experts to ensure efficiency and safety when dealing with the toxic mercury vapours that prevent most companies from recycling FPDs,’ notes a company statement.


 


The development of the FPD recycling line has involved significant investment in health and safety testing, sophisticated mercury analysing equipment and a specially-designed mercury-safe dismantling room, in addition to specialist protective equipment and training for staff on how to work safely in a potentially hazardous environment. Recycling Lives also operates lines for processing cathode ray tube screens.

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