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Veolia adds to renewable generation from food waste

United Kingdom – Waste management and recycling major Veolia has increased its capacity for generating renewable energy from food waste with a contract to design and manage a 520kWe biogas fueled energy plant for Rose Hill Recycling in Gloucestershire, UK.

The biogas is derived from mixed food waste collected from the area and is claimed to save around 1750 tonnes of CO2 emissions each year. According to Veolia, the new facility will increase the use of resources and make the site energy self-sufficient using renewable energy. ‘Reducing food waste is very important, but our unavoidable and inedible food waste still has a value as a resource’, comments Veolia’s Gavin Graveson. ‘Current estimates show that with all the UK’s inedible domestic food waste you could generate enough electricity for 350,000 households’, he stresses.

‘Food waste sent to landfill gives off methane which is around 20 times more harmful to the environment than CO2’, underlines Mark Bennion, owner and Director of Rosehill Recycling. ‘By using these scraps and peelings as a renewable energy resource, rather than sending it to landfill, we can help reduce carbon emissions and save local taxpayers money by recycling’, he adds. Rose Hill Recycling is a composting and recycling facility which processes 35 000 tonnes of food and farm waste per year.

Already playing a key role in Gloucestershire County Council’s food waste recycling strategy, the new site is now be able to generate 4.5 GWh of renewable electricity each year – enough energy to supply 1400 homes.

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