Skip to main content

Stadler’s 30 million HQ is open for business

Recycling technology provider Stadler opened its new global headquarters in Germany last Friday.

The ‘state-of-the-art’ 5-storey HQ cost a total of EUR 30 million and is located in the town of Altshausen, where Stadler was founded 228 years ago. With a 680 square-metre footprint, the premises contain 3400 square-metres of offices with working spaces for 100 people (and provision for more), six meeting rooms, and an auditorium. The roof is equipped with solar panels.

To date, Stadler has assembled more than 350 sorting plants and installed more than 3000 sorting machines worldwide. According to company ceo Willi Stadler, the expansion was necessary to accommodate the Stadler’s recent and future growth.

The grand opening welcomed regional and local politicians as well as entrepreneurs and many of Stadler’s business partners. There was a dedicated ‘family day’ on Saturday 19 October to give more than 600 guests of Stadler’s employees and collaborators the opportunity to tour the facilities and to enjoy nice food, live music, and a wide range of activities for children.

Meanwhile, Stadler is introducing a new machine developed for the construction & demolition industry: the ballistic separator STT6000. This machine is much more robust than the regular ballistic separators and is well suited for large, heavy materials, says R&D specialist Christian Nordmann.

‘There is no need for pre-sorting or pre-shredding the input,’ he adds. ‘Also, differently from screening drums, which separate the material only in two fractions, the three-fraction output of the STT6000 means that impurities can be easily removed, as they are still in their original size.’

The first STT6000 is running at Sogetri’s plant in Geneva, Switzerland.

Extra features such as big shafts without swinging frame, exchangeable wear plates on the side walls, and an integrated lubrication system, enable sorting of materials up to 1.5m in length and reduce the vulnerability to impurities and damage.

Would you like to share any interesting developments or article ideas with us? Don't hesitate to contact us.

You might find this interesting too

Vipa is ‘eager’ to grow in North America
KLM proves that plastic bottles can help fix airplanes

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Subscribe now and get a full year for just €136 (normal rate is €170) Subscribe