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Italy in breach of EU waste laws

Archiv – Italy in breach of EU waste laws

[platte tekst]The European Environmental Bureau (EEB) and its Italian member Legambiente have released an alarming report on recent developments in environmental law-making in Italy, showing that over the past two years Italy has passed a string of laws in breach of existing EU waste legislation.
The EEB is concerned that these new laws will tighten the grip of organised crime on Italy’s waste sector. In 2001, more than 11 million tonnes of waste ’disappeared’ in Italy, representing an estimated turnover of ‘‚¬ 2.6 billion for some 22 criminal gangs operating all over the country.
The Italian government adopted a new law narrowing Italy’s legal definition of waste in July 2002. Consequently, the number of secondary materials deemed not to be waste – notably ferrous and non-ferrous metal scrap – has been greatly increased. The law excludes from the scope of the waste legislation several thousands of tonnes of waste currently defined as hazardous under existing EU legislation and international treaties such as the Basel Convention. Indeed, by de-classifying this waste, Italy is promoting the export of hazardous wastes to poorer countries, says EEB.
The Italian Parliament is currently debating a new law which goes even further: companies willing to trade materials deemed not to be waste under the new Italian definition could register to conduct their business on a worldwide scale.
’These provisions will turn Italy into a safe haven for unscrupulous waste traders looking for cheap dumping grounds,’€™ concludes EEB Secretary General John Hontelez. ’Italy could be the first industrialised country to offer a convenient base for environmental criminals. We urge the Italian Parliament to prevent this scandal from going any further.’€™
The European Environmental Bureau (EEB) and its Italian member Legambiente have released an alarming report on recent developments in environmental law-making in Italy, showing that over the past two years Italy has passed a string of laws in breach of existing EU waste legislation.
The EEB is concerned that these new laws will tighten the grip of organised crime on Italy’s waste sector. In 2001, more than 11 million tonnes of waste ’disappeared’ in Italy, representing an estimated turnover of ‘‚¬ 2.6 billion for some 22 criminal gangs operating all over the country.
The Italian government adopted a new law narrowing Italy’s legal definition of waste in July 2002. Consequently, the number of secondary materials deemed not to be waste – notably ferrous and non-ferrous metal scrap – has been greatly increased. The law excludes from the scope of the waste legislation several thousands of tonnes of waste currently defined as hazardous under existing EU legislation and international treaties such as the Basel Convention. Indeed, by de-classifying this waste, Italy is promoting the export of hazardous wastes to poorer countries, says EEB.
The Italian Parliament is currently debating a new law which goes even further: companies willing to trade materials deemed not to be waste under the new Italian definition could register to conduct their business on a worldwide scale.
’These provisions will turn Italy into a safe haven for unscrupulous waste traders looking for cheap dumping grounds,’ concludes EEB Secretary General John Hontelez. ’Italy could be the first industrialised country to offer a convenient base for environmental criminals. We urge the Italian Parliament to prevent this scandal from going any further.’

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