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Analysis of Europe’s recycling strategies

    Archiv – Europe | After several years of study and data gathering, the Association of Cities and Regions for Recycling and Sustainable Resource Management (ACR+) is publishing an analysis of waste prevention and recycling in Europe. Europe | After several years of study and data gathering, the Association of Cities and Regions for Recycling and Sustainable Resource Management (ACR+) is publishing an analysis of waste prevention and recycling in Europe.
    Compiled with the support of French company Suez Environnement and its waste subsidiary SITA, ’Municipal Waste in Europe – Towards a European Recycling Society’ incorporates data covering the various waste management models in the capital cities of the EU-27’s member states. Published by Victoires Editions, it draws together Europe’s waste management policies and outlines the challenges which public authorities need to address.
    Founded 15 years ago, ACR+ brings together some 100 European local authorities with responsibility for waste management. Its President, Jean-Pierre Hannequart, comments: ’Each member authority of the association has its own strategy, which articulates the common framework of the European directives but also places it in its own particular context based on country, region, urban characteristics, and local economic and social issues. This wide diversity does not prevent the existence of many common points of view on waste management policy: each town, city and region needs to develop a prevention strategy, apply similar legal concepts, organise selective collection, and make balanced choices between various waste treatment techniques.’
    It is claimed that this book will allow technicians, decision- and policy-makers, public authorities and private companies to examine analysis methods and the parameters they need to take into account in municipal waste management. Christophe Cros, Senior Executive Vice President of Suez Environnement, says: ’A 27-member Europe varies greatly in the efficiency of their waste management methods, and each country follows its own programme adapted to its particular socioeconomic fabric. Best-practice transfers must be encouraged so new member states can benefit from the experience of pioneer states, which will lead to a homogeneous European market.’

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